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Fornander, Abraham. Ancient History of the Hawaiian People. Honolulu: Mutual Publishing, Collection of Hawaiian Antiquities and Folklore , Vol. Edited by Thomas G. Fujimura, Faith N.


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Honolulu: University of Hawaii, Kal a kaua, David. The Legends and Myths of Hawaii. Kamakau, Samuel M. Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii. Honolulu: Kamehameha Schools, Kame'eleihiwa, Lilikal a. Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press, Kepelino, Keauokalani. Kepelino's Traditions of Hawaii. Translated and edited by Martha Warren Beckwith.

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Reprinted in Kirch, Patrick. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, Kirch, Patrick and Marshall Sahlins. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, Kyselka, Will.

The works of the people of Old. Na Hana a ka Po'o Kahiko

An Ocean in Mind. The s saw the beginnings of a native-owned and operated press in the kingdom, and Hawaiian-language newspapers became a primary vehicle for the writings of Kamakau and many others. Kamakau enthralled his readers with accounts of the deeds of both gods and mortals. He alii puni kakau i ka ili a eleele, a ua poni ia i ka uhi moli a eleele hapalua kona kino, mai ke poo a na wawae; a ua paele ia kona maka a eleele. One half of his body from head to foot was tattooed black; and his face was tattooed black.

Kamakau filled nearly three hundred columns with information on nearly all aspects of Hawaiian life. Although he was greatly respected for his accumulated knowledge, his writings did not go unchallenged. Some saw his work as dangerous or a violation of kapu tabu restrictions.

In the newspaper Ka Nonanona , one literary adversary, A. Inspired by an increasing urgency, Kamakau nevertheless continued on. The s saw the beginnings of a native-owned and operated press in the kingdom, and Hawaiian-language newspapers became a primary vehicle for the writings of Kamakau and many others.

Kamakau enthralled his readers with accounts of the deeds of both gods and mortals. He alii puni kakau i ka ili a eleele, a ua poni ia i ka uhi moli a eleele hapalua kona kino, mai ke poo a na wawae; a ua paele ia kona maka a eleele. One half of his body from head to foot was tattooed black; and his face was tattooed black.

Tales and Traditions of the People of Old: Nā Mo‘olelo a ka Po‘e Kahiko (e-book)

Kamakau filled nearly three hundred columns with information on nearly all aspects of Hawaiian life. Although he was greatly respected for his accumulated knowledge, his writings did not go unchallenged. Some saw his work as dangerous or a violation of kapu tabu restrictions.